Author Archives: julee

About julee

I am a researcher in musical modernism and politics. I am also a freelance cellist and especially enjoy playing chamber music with my violinist sister yulee. I live near Hatfield House .

Cello as a metaphor

Composers take personal bonds with their instruments. There aren’t many cellist/composers around over the history. What roles did cellists play over the history? The Classical era’s cellist/composer Luigi Boccherini retained courtly and galante style, but the creative activities by cellist/composers in the Romantic … Continue reading

Posted in music and politics | Tagged , | 1 Comment

playability matters 

Surely unique compositions should be a joy to explore to performers, but why are so many compositions in the modern era at the risky fate of being neglected? In times like this, renditions by musicians who encountered and/or collaborated with … Continue reading

Posted in performance historiography | Tagged , | Leave a comment

bridging an ideological gap

If the Catalan cellist Pablo Casals’ social participatory was through an act of boycott, the Korean-born German composer Isang Yun’s democratic movement was through an act of composition. For instance, Yun’s many compositions were written as cultural participation in portraying … Continue reading

Posted in music and politics | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Casals’ political historiography

What impact has the social participatory of musicians given to the society? One of the crucial democratic movements in the early twentieth-century performance history is the cellist Pablo Casals’ refusal to play concerts in any country which recognised the Franco … Continue reading

Posted in performance historiography | Tagged , | Leave a comment

words about the Haupttöne

Isang Yun’s Haupttöne has a unique quality in the context of Western avant-garde techniques with the added flavour of Orientalism. This posting considers how the composer himself explained about the Haupttöne in his words in the Salzburg Mozarteum in 1993. Yun considered … Continue reading

Posted in orientalism | Tagged | 1 Comment

Yun and the Cold War

This posting considers how Isang Yun’s music became at the receiving ends of the cultural tensions of the Cold War in the Korean Peninsula. Whenever musical modernism is discussed in relation to politics, the Western tradition tends to consider its … Continue reading

Posted in music and politics | Tagged | Leave a comment

Yun’s Instrumentation

Isang Yun’s Orientalism in instrumentation is quite unusual. Unlike Toru Takemitsu, who enjoyed composing his native instruments; i.e. Takemitsu’s Eclipse for Biwa (Japanese lute) and Shakuhachi (Japanese bamboo flute) blends gorgeously with the Western orchestra, Isang Yun never composed music … Continue reading

Posted in orientalism | Tagged | 1 Comment